Tips To Learn To Do Toilet Installation

Tips for Buying a Toilet

to paraphrase Gertrude Stein, a toilet is a toilet is a toilet. Or so you’d think, until you take a look at the spectrum of possibilities available from today’s manufacturers and see that styles and shapes abound. Add in options for comfort, interactivity and water conservation, and today’s toilets can do almost anything—including glow in the dark

From taking care of your most basic needs to elevating your green quotient to making the ultimate style statement, there’s a toilet that’s right for you and your budget. Expect to pay anywhere from $100 for a basic commode to more than $7,000 for an ultra-chic toilet with all the amenities.

Before choosing a toilet, you’ll need to consider a few factors, such as what sort of flush you prefer and whether you want amenities such as a bidet or heated seat. You’ll also need to consider what your budget will allow. Other considerations include the size and layout of your bathroom and what sort of toilets are typically found in similar homes in your area

Two-piece toilets

These traditional models have separate tanks and bowls, which make handling easier, especially for DIY installations and for getting a toilet into tight spaces. The water inlet hole and the bolts used to fasten the tank to the bowl are sealed, and the seam between the two pieces is sealed with rubber gaskets. While the gaskets are good for years of service, they’ll eventually fail, causing leaks. Replacing the gaskets can be a hassle because the bolts and nuts tend to rust and “freeze,” requiring cutting.

One-piece toilets

This style eliminates the seam between tank and bowl. The result is a sleek design with no crevices to trap dirt. One-piece toilets tend to be more expensive than comparable two-piece models

 

How to Install a Toilet

Is your toilet cracked or damaged? Did your kid flush something that’s blocking the line? Are you looking to upgrade your commode? There are plenty of reasons for installing a toilet, and many homeowners call in a plumber to get it done. However, if you’re reasonably handy, consider trying this one yourself and saving a few bucks. Installing a toilet is a great DIY project, and just imagine the sense of accomplishment (and relief) when you finish

Tools & Materials

Installing a toilet doesn’t require much in the way of tools, and in fact, you can accomplish the task without any power tools

Toilet

plumbers I’ve spoken with say Gerber makes the best toilets, and they don’t recommend anything less than 1.6 gallons per flush

Wax ring

if the flange sits even with or slightly below the floor, get an extended-height wax ring.

Closet bolts

self-adjusting closet bolts mean you won’t need to cut or snap the excess bolt length. Unfortunately, the local DIY center may not carry these, so check a plumbing supply shop

 

How to Choose a Toilet

Choosing a new toilet for the bathroom can be an overwhelming experience. With so many options, configurations, and styles to choose from, you want to make sure you’re selecting the right toilet to suit all your needs

When selecting a new toilet for your bathroom, consider your desires, budget, and lifestyle. The right toilet can drastically improve your bathroom experience, and we’re here to help you navigate through all the different things you need to take into consideration before making your final choice.

Learn about Innovations

There is a constant stream of new innovations that make toilets work harder, last longer and stay cleaner than ever before.

Self-cleaning toilets, for example, allow you to save time, and cuts out the need to do one of the most undesired chores in the house! Our new ActiClean Self-Cleaning Toilet is the perfect solution, using a cleaning solution combined with our powerful VorMax flushing system, with both a Quick Clean and Deep Clean cycle for a bowl that’s sparkling clean at the touch of a button

Consider a Toilet that can Help Save Water

Not only is water conservation important to the environment, but it can also help save you money on your water bill each month. Standard toilets now flush at a rate of 1.6 gallons per flush (gpf) – which is less than 50% of the water used by older 3.5 gpf toilets. Due to advances in hydraulic designs, these 1.6 gpf toilets work as well, and in some cases even better than older toilets in terms of bulk removal and reducing clogs.

 

Tips on Solving Common Toilet Problems

Water Trickling Into the Bowl, or “Phantom Flushes”

You may periodically hear your toilet begin to spontaneously refill, as though someone had flushed it. A toilet that cuts on and off by itself, or runs intermittently, has a problem that plumbers call a phantom flush. The cause is a very slow leak from the tank into the bowl. This problem is almost certainly caused by a bad flapper or flapper seat. The solution is to drain the tank and bowl, check and clean the flapper seat, and replace the flapper if it’s worn or damaged.

Water Trickling Into the Tank

If you hear a sustained hissing sound coming from your toilet, it’s probably a result of water trickling into the tank via the supply line. In this case the parts to check are the float, the refill tube and the ballcock or inlet-valve assembly. The hissing sound is typically caused by water coming through the inlet valve. First check to see whether the float is sticking or needs adjusting. Next, check to make sure the refill tube isn’t inserted too far into the overflow tube. (It should extend only about 1/4″ below the rim of the overflow tube.) If neither of these adjustments solves the problem, you’ll probably need to replace the ballcock assembly as described above

The Bowl Empties Slowly

A bowl that empties slowly — also known as a weak flush — is usually the result of clogged holes underneath the rim of the bowl. Use a curved piece of wire to poke gently into each flush hole to clear out any debris. Coat-hanger wire works fine, and a small mirror will help you see under the rim. You can also use wire to loosen debris that may be blocking the siphon jet in the bottom of the drain. Be careful not to scratch the bowl

The Dreaded Clog

Clogs are the most common toilet problems. Several tools can help you clear a clogged drain. A force-cup plunger is more effective than the familiar standard type for clearing minor clogs. Insert the bulb into the drain, and pump forcefully. Slowly release the handle, letting a little water in so you can see whether the drain is clear. Repeat if necessary.

Leaky Seals

A standard toilet has at least five seals with the potential for leaking. In each case, the solution is to identify the faulty seal and tighten or replace it. The largest seal is the one between the tank and bowl. A break here will cause a major leak, with water shooting out from underneath the tank at every flush. Replacing this seal involves draining and removing the tank. Turn the tank upside down for better access. Remove the old seal and pop on a new one. The smaller seals at the mounting bolts and the base of the ballcock may also fail and cause smaller leaks. Replace these in the same way. Tightening the bolts or mounting nut occasionally is enough to stop the leak

 

How To Install A Toilet

In this simple bathroom DIY guide we’ll show you how to install a toilet. We’ll also cover removal of an old toilet for those who want to know how to replace an old toilet with a new loo

You may need to plan a toilet installation for several reasons. One of the main reasons why you might want to fit a new toilet is to replace an old one; that either went out of style years ago or has developed a fault. Another reason could be that you’ve moved into a house which hasn’t already got a toilet in the bathroom and you’ll want to know how to install a toilet from scratch

Whatever reason you have for installing a toilet, you’ll be glad to know that most toilet installations are pretty similar. This ‘how to’ DIY guide is designed to help you fit your toilet from start to finish and has been written in a simple step-by-step format to make it as simple as possible

In this how to install a toilet guide we will show you how to remove a toilet and how to dispose of your old toilet properly and safely. After the removal and disposal process we will guide you through the installation of your toilet and cistern. If you’re fitting a toilet from scratch and not replacing an old one then you can jump straight to the ‘How to install a toilet’ section

Preparation

A good rule of thumb when you’re fitting a new toilet is to handle the toilet with care. Go easy with any use of a hammer, which should hardly be required anyway, and remember that you’re dealing with porcelain. With that said, it’s also important to use a bit of force when necessary so don’t be afraid of being firm.